6 Things That Attract Mosquitoes

6 Things That Attract Mosquitoes

What are some things that attract mosquitoes?

  1. Blood and breath
  2. Body odor
  3. Dark colors
  4. Floral scents
  5. Stagnant water
  6. Cool, dark places

 

For a long time now, mosquitoes have been a problem in the Philippines. These insects are deadly because of their ability to rapidly spread disease. A good example is how the dengue fever outbreak was notoriously caused by mosquitoes. Malaria is also widespread. In fact, mosquitoes kill around 725,000 humans every year, being named as the world’s deadliest animal.

This means we need to find out the things that attract mosquitoes to understand them better and learn how to control these outbreaks. Mosquito attraction has been heavily researched through the years, and we’ve compiled in a short list the most attractive things to a mosquito. Read on to find out!

 

Blood and breath

Mosquitoes are insects that naturally feed on blood and nectar. It is the female mosquitoes who primarily need blood, and humans are definitely on the menu. Because of this, mosquitoes have a special liking for some substances and chemicals that our bodies produce. This dictates their instinct on where to get the blood that they need.

Do you know what your blood type is? We’ve never known mosquitoes to be picky eaters. But believe it or not, mosquitoes are more attracted to some blood types than others. People with type O blood are apparently more appetizing to mosquitoes than others!

These insects are also attracted to the carbon dioxide that we all exhale. Some speculate that the heat of our breath is a factor too. Recent studies add that lactic acid also attracts mosquitoes to us. Since our breath is a mix of chemicals such as both carbon dioxide and lactic acid, it becomes an appetizer for the mosquitoes.

 

Body odor

Body odor

They say one man’s trash is another man’s treasure. This time, one man’s body odor is another mosquito’s next meal. The body odor we have that comes from our sweat and other secretions could cause a mouthwatering reaction to mosquitoes (if they had mouths!)

This means that if you’re exercising, with the combination of sweat, body odor, and increased breathing rate and body heat, you start to look like the juiciest dinner for mosquitoes around!

The stuff we eat and drink also affects the secretions we produce, like lactic acid. This means that downing a beer after that workout will make you even more attractive to mosquitoes!

Quickly dry yourself, cool down with a drink of water, and cover yourself with repellant to avoid getting bitten.

 

Dark colors

Mosquitoes are not known for their eyesight. For whatever reason, they seem to be more attracted to darker colors. They can’t tell colors apart as well as we do, so maybe the strength of the color you are wearing will make you more detectable. It will serve as a signal to mosquitoes that something is nearby.

Wearing dark clothes outside will make you a bigger target for mosquitoes, so make sure you wear lighter coloring outside!

 

Floral Scents

Floral Scents

Male mosquitoes feed on nectar from flowers. While female mosquitoes are the ones who like blood, the scent of flowers still contributes to what they find attractive. What scents do your skin products use?

If your lotion, perfume, or other products smell like flowers, then it might be attracting more mosquitoes for you. Consider using different scents to avoid more mosquitoes. Or if you want, there are some floral-scented mosquito repellants out there too!

 

Stagnant water

When the dengue outbreak was at its peak, we were always reminded to avoid stagnant water. We should spill the water collecting in old tires, washing basins, and other places where water could collect. This is because stagnant water can attract mosquitoes as well.

Mosquitoes breed and lay eggs in stagnant water. Not only would spilling water avoid attracting mosquitoes, but it could also possibly eliminate eggs in the water. The fewer mosquitoes there are, the fewer vectors for disease are active.

 

Cool, dark places

Cool, dark places

Humans are not the only animals who try to steer clear of the heat. Mosquitoes also like to rest in cool, dark places, away from the heat of the sun. Tall plants often provide good shade for mosquitoes, and they can collect stagnant water from the rain. In other words, mosquitoes love vegetation too!

Keeping your plants properly trimmed and free of standing water should help.

 

Key takeaway

If your home has all these things that attract mosquitoes, then it might be a breeding ground for disease. Mosquitoes are deadly animals, and it should be our priority to protect our families from the diseases that they carry, especially in the summer.

Do you often notice mosquitoes hovering around in your home? Do you always get bites despite using repellants? Then you might need professional help. Well, you’re in the right place! We offer mosquito prevention and control, along with other pest control services! Just send us a message here and we’ll set things up!

4 Mosquito Borne Diseases You Should Know About

Close-up of mosquito sucking blood from human arm.

What are the mosquito-borne diseases you should know about?

  1. Dengue
  2. Zika virus
  3. Chikungunya
  4. Yellow fever

 

During rainy seasons, dengue is one of the most common mosquito-borne diseases in the Philippines, South-East Asia, and many other regions. But did you know that there are other diseases caused by this pesky insect? When left untreated, the worst of these diseases may even lead to fatalities. Some may not be life-threatening, but they may leave lasting effects that can make living a normal and healthy life, challenging.

Aside from dengue, mosquitos are also the cause of Zika Virus, chikungunya, yellow fever, and many more. If you want to avoid getting sick by these insects in the first place, keep a lookout for potential symptoms and make good hygiene a priority. Continue reading to learn more.

 

Dengue

Man itching and scratching on hand from allergy skin rash cause

Dengue needs no introduction, but it’s still important to understand how this is spread. This viral disease is transmitted mainly when an individual gets bitten by a female Aedes species mosquito. The females need to consume human blood in order to facilitate the reproduction of eggs. When a mosquito bites someone who is infected with the dengue virus, they will become carriers or vectors and will spread the diseases to other humans through biting.

Fever is a common dengue symptom, but you should also look out for other signs such as vomiting, nausea, headaches, skin rashes, and other body pains. There is currently no treatment. However, the World Health Organization has recommended the use of Dengvaxia (dengue vaccine CYD-TDV) only for individuals that have previously caught the infection.

If you’re recovering from dengue at home, you can also do a number of pain relief techniques such as consuming paracetamol (ibuprofen or aspirin is not prescribed, since they may cause harmful side effects, like bleeding. Make sure that you stay hydrated and that you don’t drink water that has been left stagnant for some time.

 

Zika Virus

The first recorded outbreak of the Zika Virus was in the mid-20th century in the tropical region of Africa. There have since been other reported cases of this virus in areas like Central America, Africa, the Caribbean, South-East Asia, and the Pacific Region.

Zika Virus is transmitted similarly to dengue — i.e. through the bite of an Aedes mosquito — however, there are a few key differences. For one, there is potential for human-to-human transmission, especially after intercourse with an infected person. Pregnant women who contract this disease are also likely to pass it onto the baby, causing potential birth defects.

Another difference is that people infected with the Zika Virus may be asymptomatic or may only show mild symptoms like fever, body pains, conjunctivitis, or rashes. Consistently applying mosquito-repellent lotions, wearing covered outfits, and making sure that there is no standing water at home can help oneself from this disease.

 

Chikungunya

Close-up of mosquito sucking blood from human arm.

Also known as CHIK fever, chikungunya is transmitted by the Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquito and has spread in the Asia-Pacific, Africa, Europe, and Asia. Similar to the Zika Virus and dengue chikungunya is spread through bites from infected mosquitoes.

Symptoms from this mosquito-borne virus in infected individuals will show around 3 to 7 days after being bitten. These symptoms can be mild to debilitating, which can affect everyday life. Muscle and joint pains, in particular, may last for several months even after all other symptoms have gone away (fever, rashes, headaches).

Patients that have recovered from either any of the three diseases on the list may already be protected or immune from further reinfection in the future. You can protect yourself from this disease by practicing proper hygiene, wearing covered clothing, applying mosquito repellents, and keeping your surroundings clean and tidy.

 

Yellow Fever

Yellow fever is another mosquito-transmitted disease caused by the Aedes or the Haemagogus species. A typical symptom of this disease may be the following: body pains, nausea, vomiting, headaches, exhaustion, lethargy (weakness), chills, and fever. In some cases, patients may even develop jaundice which causes the skin and the eyes to turn yellowish.

The disease is endemic in Central America, South America, as well as Africa. Upon infection, the symptoms can be mild or severe. Most patients are able to recover and will not show any symptoms after four days. In severe cases, however, patients may experience a number of cardiac, kidney, and liver issues — all of which can result in fatality.

Yellow fever prevention can be done by taking precautions similar to what you’d do to prevent dengue, Zika Virus, and chikungunya. Vaccination is also effective and can provide long-lasting protection against the virus.

 

Key Takeaway

Some of the mosquito-borne diseases covered in this guide include the following: dengue, chikungunya, Zika Virus, and yellow fever. The most common type of mosquito species causing these diseases is the Aedes, but in the case of yellow fever, the Haemagogus species may also be the culprit. As long as you take all the necessary precautions to counter diseases, you can stay safe without any worries.

Is your building a breeding ground for mosquitoes during the rainy season? You may need professional pest control services from Topbest. Get in touch with us now and get a free consultation!

How to Prevent Mosquito Infestations During the Rainy Season

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How can you prevent mosquito infestation during the rainy season?

  1. Eliminate Stagnant Water Immediately
  2. Utilize Mosquito Replants and Sprays
  3. Keep Your Doors and Windows Closed
  4. Professional Maintenance and Prevention
  5. Declutter and Get Rid of Trash Daily

 

The rainy season has finally arrived. While we all indulge in the colder months, you should also be aware that it can come with downsides for your home. One of them being an influx in mosquitos. These pests just love moisture and humidity, and if your home is not well taken care of, you may experience a mosquito infestation. Luckily, there are many easy ways to prevent them from coming close to your home. In this article, we will explore some of the most effective ways on how to prevent mosquitos during the rainy season.  If not prevented, these pests can put you and your family at higher risks to not only bites but to mosquito-transmitted diseases such as dengue, diarrhea, viral fever, typhoid, and more.

 

Eliminate Stagnant Water Immediately

Standing or stagnant water is one of the most common places that mosquitos breed and lay their eggs. In fact, female mosquitos can lay eggs that can turn into over more than a thousand mosquitoes. So make sure that you get rid of stagnant water immediately and thoroughly clean and empty pools, buckets, and containers and fill them with fresh water regularly.

In the case that you do accumulate mosquitos in a part of your home with stagnant water, make sure that you kill them first before throwing it out. This can be easily done by adding one milliliter of soap for every gallon of water. The mosquitos will drown with the addition of soap.

 

Utilize Mosquito Replants and Sprays

Now is the time you should maximize the use of your mosquito repellents and sprays. It is one of the quickest and most effective ways to prevent mosquito infestation in your house. Although it is important to use these with caution and as per the guidelines mentioned on its labels, especially if you have children and family members with respiratory concerns. If you are going outdoors, make sure that you also apply mosquito repellent cream on your body for an extra level of protection.

There are also a bunch of natural alternatives for chemical insect repellents such as camphor, garlic, coffee grounds, essential oils, and mint. However, they may not be as effective and work as fast.

If you don’t have any repellents and sprays stocked up on your home, you can easily find these products in a grocery store near you.

 

Keep Your Doors and Windows Closed

Always remember to keep your doors and windows at home shut during the rainy season. If you want some air and ventilation inside, make sure to use window nests or screens to prevent mosquitos from entering your home.

 

Professional Maintenance and Prevention

Professional Maintenance and Prevention

If you really want to prevent a mosquito infestation and mosquito-transmitted diseases at home, it’s best to rely on professionals such as pest control services to get the job done. With this, you are offered a reliable and guaranteed method. Plus, there are pest control companies that also offer environment-friendly and low-risk chemicals that will be safe for everyone in the family.

And if you haven’t considered pest maintenance at home, now is the time you should. It keeps your home free from pest-related diseases and ensures proper and safe pest control for all year round.

 

Declutter and Get Rid of Trash Daily Declutter

Mosquitos also love to breed on trash and any type of clutter. So, make sure that you keep your trash bins tightly sealed. It is also highly recommended to take the trash out daily for further prevention.

 

Key Takeaway

Now that the rainy season is here, make sure that you are taking steps on how to prevent mosquitos during the rainy season to lessen you and your family’s risks of bites and catching mosquito-transmitted diseases. If you’d like a mosquito and pest-free home throughout the rainy season, Topbest holds a staff of certified professionals who can help! Contact us for your pest control needs by clicking here!

Understanding the Behavior of Dengue Mosquitoes

Feeding Pattern and Biting Behavior

What are the important things to remember regarding dengue mosquito behavior?

  1. Preliminaries
  2. Habitat and Reproductive Cycle
  3. Feeding Pattern and Biting Behavior
  4. Tips for Mosquito Control

 

The Aedes aegypti mosquito, otherwise known as the dengue mosquito, is an insect that has been under scrutiny recently due to the widespread outbreaks of the dengue virus. Since the virus is yet to have a vaccine that has been proven to be effective, mosquito control and prevention are still the main priority when it comes to combating the dengue epidemic.

This brings us back to the Aedes aegypti. As the only vector for the disease, knowing its specific characteristics and behavior is crucial to effective mosquito control. No one wants to be afflicted with the potentially lethal disease, so for that not to happen being informed is the first step. Here is what you need to know about dengue mosquitoes and their behavior.

 

Preliminaries

Preliminaries

Before going into specific behavioral information, it is always important to be reminded of the basic information. The Aedes aegypti is a small, dark mosquito with white, lyre-shaped markings and banded legs. They are the only mosquitoes aside from other members of the Aedes genus that can transmit the dengue virus.

In terms of the virus itself, there are four known kinds of dengue and getting infected with any one of the four leads to the same symptoms and complications. Getting infected would also mean developing a life-long resistance to the virus itself, but do not forget that there are four variations and that you are only going to be immune to the specific type of dengue you have already contracted. This means you can potentially be infected with four different types in four separate instances if you’re unlucky. Just because you’ve recovered from one instance doesn’t mean you’re already safe. Complacency should be avoided.

Now that we have the preliminary information out of the way, it’s time to bring the focus back to the insect itself because there is much to know about them.

 

Habitat and Reproductive Cycle

Habitat and Reproductive Cycle

If you didn’t already know, the Aedes aegypti is an insect that likes to live and breed around wet areas, especially open sources of water. This is because their eggs and subsequent larvae can only survive in water. After male and female mosquitoes mate, a process that can be as quick as fifteen seconds, the female will need a good amount of nutrients to help produce the eggs i.e. protein-rich blood.

This is where it will go out and find people and other organisms to bite. After successfully producing the eggs, the female mosquito will find a water container, be it natural or artificial, to lay their eggs in. This can come in the form of a tree stump, a flower pot, discarded tires, buckets, tin cans, gutters, and many more as long as it has stagnant water. Aside from that, places that are within close range to where humans live are ideal larval habitats. Underground collections of water are also not out of the question.

 

Feeding Pattern and Biting Behavior

Feeding Pattern and Biting Behavior

Since females are the only ones that require blood as a food source, they are the only ones that bite other organisms. They prefer biting people because human blood is usually protein-rich and has nutrients. However, they also bite other creatures like dogs and other domesticated animals. Male Aedes aegypti are content with consuming plant nectar and will not bite.

Aedes aegypti bites are most common during the day, specifically two hours after sunrise and a couple of hours before sunset. However, don’t feel complacent at night because well-lit areas naturally attract mosquitoes and they will still bite if the opportunity arises. In terms of where they prefer to bite humans, the Aedes aegypti has been observed to prefer biting from behind, targetting your ankles and elbows.

 

Tips for Mosquito Control

Tips for Mosquito Control

Now that you have information to work with, here are a couple of tips for mosquito control that you can use to help prevent the spreading of dengue:
Source reduction – eliminate unnecessary container habitats that collect water because mosquitoes can, and will, breed their larvae in those habitats.

In connection to source reduction, using direct water sources and minimizing the use of wells and other water containers as a water source will be helpful.
To prevent bites, use mosquito repellant or wear long-sleeved clothing to protect your elbows and ankles.

If possible, look at the mosquito biting you because Aedes aegypti will have white marks on its body. It’s hard to miss it once spotted.
Contact your health authorities if you see an alarming amount of mosquitos in your area so that they can conduct an inspection and implement the necessary countermeasures.

 

Key Takeaway

A Dengue epidemic can be frightening, especially if it happens in your area. However, there’s no need to panic because there are things you can do to combat it and avoid getting infected. It all starts with being informed and then acting upon the information you’ve gained.

How to Prevent the Cultivation of Mosquitoes

What Are Parasites?

What are the things you need to know to prevent the cultivation of mosquitoes?

  • How long it takes for mosquitoes to hatch eggs
  • How to prevent mosquitoes from breeding
  • The dangers of mosquitoes
  • Using insecticides

 

Mosquitoes are one of the most annoying creatures that you can encounter. They are known to spread various diseases and are health hazards to the population. Pest control and free pest inspection services may help you exterminate and prevent the spawning of these pests around your home or identify where they come from, but you can also prevent the cultivation of mosquitoes on your own. Here are a few methods on how to keep these pests away:

 

How Long Does it Take for Mosquitoes to Hatch?

A mosquito is capable of laying around 100 to 200 eggs at a time. After a female mosquito lays her eggs in water, the eggs only need around a day or two to hatch. Once the eggs hatch, hundreds of larvae will be released. Mosquito larvae can usually be seen at the surface of the water they inhabit. Mosquito larvae are aquatic and need water in order to survive.

How Long Does it take for mosquitoes to hatch

In around 5 to 10 days, these little wrigglers will transform into pupae. A mosquito pupa can also be seen on the surface of the infested water. In the span of around 7 to 10 days, the pupa metamorphosis of this creature will be complete and it will turn into an adult mosquito.

As the new adults emerge, they will remain on top of the water, waiting for their wings to dry before taking off. The female mosquitoes will then look for animals to feed on in order to nourish eggs for fertilization, before laying another batch of over a hundred eggs.

 

How to Prevent Mosquitoes from Breeding?

There are plenty of ways to prevent mosquitoes from breeding around your home or ways to eliminate and stop the process of mosquitoes from developing. These creatures breed in silence and can slip under our guise if we don’t carefully observe the surroundings of our household environment. Here are ways for us to prevent mosquitoes from breeding.

 

Take Note of Places Around Your House where Water May Accumulate

Always observe the surroundings of your own home. You never know where water may accumulate. If you notice any areas where water may gather, keep them clean regularly. It’s ideal to sweep away any unnecessary puddles of water.

Don't leave stagnant water around

Don’t leave stagnant water around

Mosquitoes need stagnant water to lay their eggs. The hatchlings also thrive in stagnant water conditions. Mosquito larvae survive in stagnant water due to their generally static lifestyle. In order to breathe properly, they need to stay afloat and still, the same goes for the pupae as well.

If you have any stagnant water lying around the perimeter of your home, throw them out. These are potential nesting grounds for hundreds of mosquitoes. Even small puddles of stagnant water need to be cleaned out to totally prevent mosquitoes from breeding.

During mosquito season, keep your house’s gutters clean, cover any water barrels, throw out old water from buckets. Or if you have a pool or a pond, clean them regularly. Keep in mind that if you have pets living outside your house, make sure that their water bowls are often changed. Acting quickly is essential as the life cycle of a mosquito is extremely quick. In a week or so, the eggs will turn into adults.

 

Keep your Surroundings Clean

Keeping your surroundings clean will be the best form of preventive maintenance when it comes to keeping mosquitoes from breeding around your house. Unbeknownst to many homeowners, many damp places may accumulate a significant amount of water levels for mosquitoes to breed.
Those with pools and ponds need to keep water circulating in order to prevent mosquitoes from breeding in those areas.

Once your pool or pond’s water pump ceases, mosquitoes may quickly cultivate there. If ever that happens, quickly have your water pump serviced.
If you have any garbage cans or bins outdoor, ensure that they are always covered. When they have no lid, make sure that they are free of any form of stagnant water, especially after a rainy day. Keep these bins clean at all costs.

 

The Dangers of Mosquitoes

Not only are mosquitoes a nuisance, but they also have the potential to pose a threat to people’s health. Mosquito bites, in general, are not dangerous. It’s the secondary effects of mosquito bites that may be harmful to people. Aside from the itchiness they leave on your skin, mosquitoes may carry and transmit harmful diseases such as Zika virus, yellow fever, malaria, tularemia, encephalitis, dengue, chikungunya, and canine heartworms.

 

Use Insecticides

Use Insecticides

You may use chemicals against mosquitoes to keep your house mosquito free or plant some mosquito repelling plants such as citronella or lemon grass. These are easy and effective ways to keep mosquitoes away from the premises of your home. Mosquitoes are known to travel for miles in search of places to spawn and breed. Using chemical or natural repellents will prevent these pesky pests from coming into contact with your household. When the situation gets worse, pest control is your only answer.

 

Key Takeaway

Following these methods will surely prevent the cultivation of mosquitoes in your home.  Try inquiring for a free pest inspection to know where these pests may breed and prevent other pests from invading your home. In retrospect, keeping your house clean will prevent mosquitoes and most pests from cultivating in your humble abode.